Sunday, November 16, 2008

my so-called saturday

This tree fascinates me. It has long white flowers in the Spring, a purple pod in the Summer, and these stars in the Fall. I have no idea what it is called.



Yesterday was supposed to be a very productive Saturday. I was going to get up early, finish up clearing the rock wall, plant new bedding plants, and catch up on my professional reading.


If I had entered the Olympics, I would score straight zeros in the compulsory round.


I slept in well past 9. And Jiggs let me get away with it.


I awoke to one of the most pleasant mid-November days I have ever seen. If you have ever lived in British Columbia, Ireland, or England in November, you would know exactly what to expect in Oregon: gray skies, constant drizzle, and a temperature that hovers in the 40s.


Not today. Clear. Sunny. 37. A perfect day for gardening.


So, I cooked up some left overs, retired to the hot tub, and read an alternative history novel about the post-Civil War years. I enjoyed every minute, but I was certainly not getting my chores accomplished.


Jiggs pestered me enough to take him for a long walk. He did great -- on the walk. Now, he is stumbling around on three legs.


Around 2, I headed off to visit the nurseries for bedding plants. Apparently, they understand the seasons better than I do -- they were closed until February. I could have bought a few scraggly plants at Home Depot. Instead, the rock wall gets moved to February.


That was the day. I did nothing I had planned. And that is fine with me.

21 comments:

Calypso said...

"That was the day. I did nothing I had planned. And that is fine with me."

Now that is the right attitude hombre - you are ready for retirement.

Islagringo said...

That is exactly the kind of day your soul calls out for from time to time. And exactly what retirement should be like!

Steve Cotton said...

John and Wayne -- Being the retirement masters you are, I take your comments as the highest of praise.

Michael Dickson said...

But, Steve, you are NOT retired. You have many, many chores to do before (you claim) you will move to Mexico. Yet virtually every weekend pressing matters concerning the move are ignored. You retire to the hot tub with a book. You contemplate your belly button.

Or you hunt flowers for the home (you claim) you are leaving. Hmmmm.

Steve Cotton said...

Michael -- I have long had the discipline of a teenager when it comes to my personal life. Thus, the failure to establish a marriage. But retirement is coming. My date is set. My job duties are being distributed. My house agreement in Mexico is signed. A house sitter is signed up to watch my house until the market improves. And I am looking forward to the move. I probably am a bit further along with the move than my blog personality would indicate. Surprised you will be when I knock on the gate of the ranchito.

Michael Dickson said...

You´ll have to let me know in advance. Knocks on the Ranchito gate go ignored more often than not. Could be someone selling tortillas or Jehovah´s Witnesses.

Or some Salvation Army guy!

But I´d let you in for sure.

Cory said...

I took a similar picture on Thursday at the Oregon Garden. I did not get the name either of the tree either.

If I have not already I will post my picture.

Jackie said...

Steve,
That tree does not look like a tree that you would expect to find in Oregon. It looks very exotic. Yes, the weather yesterday and again today is wonderful for this time of year.

Cairelle said...

OMG, 37 degrees? Perfect for gardening? Aacck! I'm STILL in bed (at 3pm) because it's in the low 50's outside and therefore my old creaky New Orleans house is chilled as well.

Kirk is bribing me with a trip to our coffeehouse where I could get a nice warm hot cocoa... but this requires putting my feet onto the cold floor, AND disturbing Bitty Bobb out of his warm nest at the small of my back. Sigh.

Are you getting more excited about your impending retirement?

Steve Cotton said...

Michael -- Before I show up at your gate, a liveried footman will have dropped off my calling card a good week before I show up seeking my own personal tour of the Pumpkin Wall.

Cory -- The tree has fascinated me over the past few years. This is the first time I have photographed each of its stages.

Jackie -- It clearly is a specimen tree, and not native. It is in the park betwen the Archives Building and the Agriculture Building -- who says we Gringos do not know how to slather on the bureauacracy.

Cairelle -- I just came in from working on the garden. It is 48 right now, and I was sweating from cutting back some of the brush. For me, this is short-sleeve weather -- and Jiggs loves it. If the temperature reaches 65, he starts looking for the shade. Makes you wonder how the two of us are going to survive Mexico. I do believe the word is "tolerate," That we can do.

Cairelle said...

Oh I'll survive... but perhaps my dislike of the cold means I should reconsider my "top ten" list of places to investigate... LOL!

Steve Cotton said...

Cairelle -- Fortunately, for you, I am still in Oregon. And, despite what Michael avers, I will be heading south in May -- where I will be dealing with weather that will make you very happy.

Kathleen said...

Wow, I'm intrigued by the tree, too. I wonder what it is...

Islaholic Trixie said...

I cannot believe you think 47 degrees can be gardening weather!!
I would be turning on the fireplace and wrapping up in a warm blanket with a cup of hot chocolate....which is where we are at now here in Minnesnowta!!

Steve Cotton said...

Kathleen -- We will see if we have any tree experts tomorrow. I decided to troll for answers.

Brenda -- 47 is warm enough for me to do the gardening -- as long as the sun is out. Whenever it ducks behind a cloud, I get a little chilly. But I keep the house at 55 in the winter. So, 47 is really not that cool.

Babs said...

Your last paragraph says it all....hopefully. I lie that way every day, if I can. Lately I find myself resenting if I have too
many and sometimes ANY scheduled things to do.
I LOVE the freedom. You'll get there.....or maybe you're already there!

glorv1 said...

That is a beautiful tree. I hope Jiggs is feeling better now. I've been uder the weather as well. Have a great day.

Anonymous said...

Given your penchant for cold weather, I don't wonder how you will survive Mexico--I just wonder how you will survive your chosen bit of it.

As someone who has changed climate a few times (San Fran to Houston for undergrad. Then moved to Boston later.), I can tell you that it takes more than a year to get used to a new climate.

I'm with Michael. You should seriously consider the central highlands, or methinks you will roast.

Fond regards,

Kim G
Boston, MA

Steve Cotton said...

Kim -- you are very perceptive. I try to carefully point out that I only hope to tolerate the Pacific coast heat in the Mexico summer. But I suffer enough coastal romanticism that I will either have it burned out of me -- or I will find that is where I want to live. After my 6 months on the coast, I intend to rent in the highlands -- but not Mexico City. I may be an urbanite at heart, but I do not need that much urban.

aighmeigh said...

this is going to be a very odd comment, and maybe it's the advil pm talking... but that's a pretty sexy flower! i've never seen anything like it... it's really cool! :P i really should step away from the computer now...

Steve Cotton said...

It does have its sensuous aspects. But I thought it looked like a brooch.